China Next War
Home ] H́nhẢnh HảiChiến HoàngSa ] 客观资料TưLiệu ChủQuyen VN ] Chinese Landmen ] Tham-Luận Biển Đông ] Bản-Đồ Nước Triệu km2 ] T́m Bản-Đồ Nước Việt ] Hải Phận Triệu Km2 ] Hải-phận Việt-Nam - Triệu Km2 (tiếp) ] Hải Phận Valencia ] HoàngSa HảiChiến CTCT ] Forum Openings ] TàiLiệu PhápLư ] Geography P ] Geography S ] Tonkin Gulf ] Law of the Sea ] RVN WhitePaper75 ] Monique-C-Gendreau ] Lawyers' Opinion ] Facts & Fictions ] VN vs Chinese ] VN Sovereignty ] VN Water Culture ] Mischief & Others ] Declarations ] SRVN's View ] Observers' Seat ] Taiwan Analysis ] Naval Battles ] Time Line ] Photo Album ] NguyễnNhă-NghiênCứu HoàngSa ] NguyễnNhă- HànChấnHoa ] TàiLiệuHC HoàngSa ] China Arguments ] China's Boundary ] China's Policy ] [ China Next War ] Bàn-luận về Chủ-quyền Hải-phận Biển Đông ] ChinaPropaganda-LuuVanLoi ]

 

CHINA'S NEXT WAR at South China Sea,?

    THE MOST LIKELY site for a war is probably the South China Sea, which China claims as its own 1,000-mile long pond. This huge sea, encompassing the Paracel and Spratly Island groups, covers major international shipping routes, including those that carry oil from the gulf to Japan. The area is also claimed in part by Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan and the Philippines.

    China and Vietnam have fought naval battles in the area in 1974 and 1988, and the danger of a more decisive conflict may be growing for two reasons. First, some experts believe that there are extensive oil and natural gas deposits in the area, enhancing its appeal. China itself has estimated that the South China Sea floor contains 105 billion barrels of oil, an extravagant guess that it has since backed away from. But even vague hopes that the area is so bountiful will encourage Beijing to use force to control the sea. Second, China has always regarded the area as its own, but it is only now gaining the ability to enforce its view. The Chinese armed forces have extended a landing strip on Woody Island, the largest of the Paracels, so that it is now 2,600 meters long, thus creating a staging ground for any conflict.
    More ominously, China last year awarded exploration rights for a disputed part of the sea--an area that Vietnam insists is part of its continental shelf--to Crestone Energy Corporation, an American oil company. The head of the company told me he was promised the full backing of the Chinese navy in exploring the area...

---

From "The Rise of China", N. D. Kristof